February 2020: Reading Round-up

February 2020: Reading Round-up

Books I've read (or finished reading) in January and February 2020.
Books finished in January and February 2020.

The latest one sentence summaries of the books I’ve read between the last round up in December 2019 and the end of February 2020.

Non-fiction

Booker T. Jones “Time is Tight: My Life, Note By Note”: The life and times of the legendary multi-talented Booker T., running from pre-Stax to the current day, all arranged by theme, rather than in a linear time-line.

Michael Caine “Blowing the Bloody Doors Off and Other Lessons in Life”: Caine reflects on the many things he’s learned over his life and career and passes them on, in an autobiographical way.

Jan Morris “In My Mind’s Eye”: Arguably Britain’s best travel writer turns her hand to keeping a diary for half a year, laying out her thoughts, sometimes big, sometimes small, but always engaging.

Vivien Goldman “Revenge of the She-Punks”: Insightful exploration of how women in (rock) music across the globe have been addressing some of the world’s problems from a feminist perspective, with illustrative playlists for each chapter, although the conclusion could have been much stronger.

Richard Fortey “The Earth: An Intimate History”: A fascinating history of planet earth, with a focus on plate tectonics to explain how the continents and mountains ended up where they (currently) are; could have done with a few more diagrams to illustrate some of his descriptions.

Simon Yates “Against the Wall”: The man who cut the rope on Joe Simpson in “Touching The Void” heads to Patagonia to tackle a new route up the east face of the Central Tower of Paine, and comes away having learned several personal lessons about life.

Fiction

Jonathan Coe “In My Mind’s Eye”: Brilliant book that perfectly captures the zeitgeist of post-referendum Britain in a way that is both humorous and deeply insightful.

Peter Robinson “Careless Love”: The latest book in the DCI Banks series: this time Banks (and Annie) attempt to unravel the mystery surrounding the deaths of three people all dressed to the nines yet found in separate remote locations within a short space of time.

Vladimir Nabokov “Lolita”: Nabokov’s classic tale about Humbert Humbert—recently departed—and his fantasies about nymphets and how, through a strange series of coincidences, he ends up realising them with his stepdaughter Dolores (aka Lolita), before things go awry.

Ann Cleeves “Wild Fire”: The final book in the Shetland series: detective Jimmy Perez tries to find the killers of a live-in nanny and an island gossip, with the usual twists and turns that come from living in a small island community.